The Bunny Bazooka Dilemma

just words

I got 400 views on my Quora answers today! I’m up to 15,000 answer views, total!

Quora is a website similar to a blog, where lots of people ask questions and anybody can submit an answer. I have more activity there then on my own (this) blog, and invite you to come across!

Here’s an example of a Quora question, asked by a member of the public, which I fielded, and my answer … This one’s about political stuff; I hope to inspire people to appreciate our government. I also, often write about addiction.

I admit I like to write, and Quora is a place where I can stretch my legs, and gallup! They don’t mind if I write enormously-long, detailed manuscripts, and people come in and read and appreciate them, as long as they’re on topic and make a good point.

Question:

What would likely happen if a state trooper tried to enforce federal marijuana laws in a state that had legalized it?

Answer:

This would be possible by the FBI, or a federal agent of some sort, but state troopers are employed to patrol interstate highways, because they’re interstate, and sometimes to play a role in small rural towns that don’t have any local police, but only by agreement with the municipality.

Enforcement doesn’t just broaden itself to ruin your day. If a federal agent wanted to bust someone in a state where pot was legal, it would be a significant and newsworthy event. Other states where it was also legal would take notice, and hopefully their lawmakers would remind Congress of incongruities.

Marijuana is a federal offense, and the future of the law is anybody’s guess, but state troopers aren’t looking to change or violate the laws of their own state, and it’s not their job. If you break the law in your car on the highway you will get in trouble, according to the state’s laws.

So the answer is, he wouldn’t. But if he did, he wouldn’t be doing his job correctly, and that would probably be true in the eyes of the Attorney General of the state, to whom you could write a letter. The suspect would have a hard time back-peddling out of the problem, and may have incurred other perfectly legitimate charges.

For example, driving your car under the influence of marijuana is illegal in every state, and the suspect handed the trooper a good legal reason to suspect this, on a silver platter!

Especially if the suspect was holding pot in the glove compartment, driving, and even just a little argumentative or obstinate.

If this were to happen, I’d recommend not challenging the trooper’s decision on the side of the road, and getting a lawyer.

There are very few examples in the United States where federal authority ever overrides state autonomy, and for good reason.

It’s the foundation of a good system. And it’s historically endearing; in other words, they call it the “United States!”

But it comes to mind one unusual circumstance, that I’ll call the “bunny bazooka dilemma.” This is where your favorite bunny-rabbit hops across the state border, into your neighboring state, where hunting rabbits by bazooka is perfectly legal.

It’s lights out!

I’m making it funny, but this is the baseline of state authority, and the default way things are.

The rare situation is based on that innocent bunny not knowing the law (understandably), a little science, and preservation. If a federal wildlife refuge overlaps states, it could save your bunny and other wandering animals, wandering, but still part of wildlife, which is of interest to everyone.

You can probably see how a dispute between Alaska, for example, and the federal government over who can shoot the coyotes, in Alaska, on federal preservation land, can seem like a waste of time, compared to a solution through a single decision-making authority.

From a political point of view, or any other angle, things get awkward immediately without state autonomy. Generally speaking, if the federal government, tomorrow, said we’re going to enforce federal marijuana laws in Colorado, it would bring into question every instance, floating in the air, where the federal government is not interceding in state activity. States would protest.

The issue is bigger than the pot in your car.

From the point of view of you on the highway, on your way home from work, you’re under the state’s jurisdiction, directly.

If you are obeying the state’s laws, you’re safe from problems with law enforcement, unless you get pulled over by the FBI, which, it’s a long shot, but technically, could happen.

The bunny’s on his own! (In fact, I think it’s technically illegal for a bunny to smoke marijuana on a federal wildlife reservation!)

In the United States, people from all different states can support the concept of bunnies being under a safety umbrella that crosses state borders, but even with the cute edge, even with the bunnies hopping through the borders all day at their potential peril, it’s an example of very rare federal intervention, and it’s still controversial.

God bless you, and have a great day!

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My @Quora profile

https://www.quora.com/profile/Mark-Urso?share=2e34cd0f&srid=3Z6iQ

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: MANATEES DEMAND APOLOGY

Hello. My name is Fred, and I’m a manatee. I’m writing because I was offended by the tone of the previous article on this blog, titled “Press Release About Manatees.”

The author even admits he doesn’t know anything about manatees, and it’s not really a press release. We manatees don’t like it when humans act in a distrespectful manner toward us, and demand an apology. We also have a short list. Continue reading “FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: MANATEES DEMAND APOLOGY”

PRESS RELEASE ABOUT MANATEES

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The manatee is in danger. We must help!

The manatee is a fat, lazy animal that flops around a little, living just “on the edge of existence,” according to “Forces of Nature,” a documentary airing on WSBE TV.

The narrator explained, while I painfully watched footage of manatees floating lazily around some food-type plants but making no effort to eat, Continue reading “PRESS RELEASE ABOUT MANATEES”

Let Your Inner Cat Out!

a cat in a bowl shaped like a fish with an apple

I wrote an article recently about a fisher that ran into my screened-in porch chasing my cat.

I was sure I wanted to, but wasn’t sure how to, respond to the many comments I got from people pleading with me to keep my cat indoors. I don’t want to do that!

It’s not me, really, but I’m a diplomatic kind of soul. If I were the cat, I wouldn’t want me to do that!  Continue reading “Let Your Inner Cat Out!”

The Fisher (Sighting: Westerly, RI, 2017)

I had a fisher on my back porch last night. It chased my cat right into the screened-in porch. The cat smartly scooted under the couch but not before hollering for me.

I heard her and came out from my room, and there was a very large “cat,” something odd about it … which had obviously chased her in, causing her to yell to get my attention – While I was immediately concerned for my cat and was looking for her (but she was under the couch), I didn’t really examine this supersized “cat” that was standing there waiting for me to tell it to go away. I went for a quick flashlight grab, returned, and the fisher was sniffing the bottom of the couch. I figured it out immediately and said “Get out of here!” and the animal departed quickly.

It was maybe ten last night. I’m in Westerly, RI, on the river Continue reading “The Fisher (Sighting: Westerly, RI, 2017)”

Time and Distance; Nature Cat And a Real Live Mouse (A Tiny Documentary)

cat and mouse

In “Everything Theory” we sometimes talk in complicated ways about simple things. Everything Theory is about Nature, though, and as a philosopher, I like to think Nature is not too complicated for us mortal non-scientists to understand. It’s a simple philosophy: Nature wouldn’t work if animals didn’t know what they were supposed to do!

I’m guilty of complicating it, while trying to unravel nature’s messages, in recent posts about “Everything,” one of my most loved topics.

Then I got a cat. Things got simple again!

TitanicFor example, I used the Titanic to illustrate how time and distance are bound together, like one thing, and there’s nothing we can do about it, even when it’s life or death.

The Titanic is a terrific example, and it’s freezing at the end of the story made for a strong analogy to the inescapable character of time. “If we could manipulate time and distance,” I eloquently wrote, “we would have, and all these statistics would be different.” My treatment of the topic – time and distance – I thought, was a little elaborate, but thorough.

Then I saw what the cat did. Continue reading “Time and Distance; Nature Cat And a Real Live Mouse (A Tiny Documentary)”

Chasing Pterodactyl and Sharing the Moon

My stepson Todd and I went kayaking recently on the river where I live. I’m not alone, accompanied in my river habitat by impressive creatures, from tiny lobster-like critters determined to cross the lawn in the spring, to overgrown slow-motion snapping turtles and prehistoric-looking great blue herons.

great blue heron
Great Blue Heron

The herons are big and have zombie eyes. Todd and I both got a good look that day on the river. As we approached a wide corner, the background a big spread of low-lying grass where “Mister Blue” (I just made that up now) likes to hang around, I told Todd “We’ll see him up here … I’ll flush him out!” Feeling confident, we pushed forward on the water a little Continue reading “Chasing Pterodactyl and Sharing the Moon”